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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
money and asked -- it appointed john adams to go to france to borrow, to try to raise money in france from the french government to pay for the revolution. he decided to take his 10-year-old son john quincy adams with him, his oldest, his firstborn, the oldest of his three sons. john quincy adams buy then was a devoted patriot at 7-years-old when his father was in the continental congress. his mother abigail adams heard fire in the distance and she took her boy up to the top of the hill behind in quincy massachusetts so they could look across boston bay and they saw the battle of bunker hill. and she took her boy by the hand, came back down by the farm house and began melting down the family pewter to make muskets for the patriots and she told her son at the time you must rise to the head of your country, and if you don't succeed, it will be because of your own laziness and obstinacy. [laughter] you must make a revolution, resolution in favor of virtue, integrity and love of your country. and that's how john and abigail adams raised their way from the beginning, their oldest son come
will continue. >> well, from of a need to france now. ask anyone the question -- what are the french most famous for? it is likely that the answer -- well, one of the answers anyway -- would be producing wine, but a growing number of those world famous vineyards are being bought up by the chinese as a new middle class in china is starting to develop a taste for french wine. investors are seeing new opportunities in the big wine regions, and not unexpectedly, it is a development which is not popular with some of the french. >> it seems everything she turns her hand to is a success. she is one of china's biggest celebrities -- singer, model, actress -- and now honor of a prestigious french vineyard. it was in french hands for four centuries before the chinese came. in china, red wine has become the latest new thing, and increasing numbers of chinese are heading to france to invest in their very own vineyard. >> i tried several other lines before, but when i came here, everything was just right -- the building, the surroundings, everything. i fell in love with the place straightaway, and the wine.
're the only country that does it, let's be like france, greece, and spain and not have one and get to the cliff-- >> a quick reminder, by the way, adam of the 16 trillion dollars of debt that currently is on the table for the united states. 6 billion of that debt, neil, has been put on the books under president obama's watch. >> 6 trillion. >> 6 trillion. we're talking about adding on to that. where is he he coming up with the numbers? which economist is he citing and where are the polls-- >> warren buffett said earlier in the week it's not about economics it's about making people feel good. -- let me stop a second. did you say where he does he pull these numbers out of. >> seriously, seriously. >> neil: i wanted to make sure i heard you correctly. talk about a pain in the gas. the price is record high this time of year and we're getting new proposals to hike gasoline prices to pay down the debt. where will it go. the gang from forbes is on that. that's at the top of the hour. forget having the in-laws over for dinner, more families are shacking up together. young, old and everyone
democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representatives of belgium voted for a similar ban although the law expected to be challenged in a constitutional court. in spain in 2010 the catalonia and assembly narrowly rejected a proposed ban on a burke got in all public places reversing an earlier vote. similar laws are in progress in italy as well. in switzerland after a campaign designed to appeal to fears of a muslim takeover, a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the constru
-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signature proposal is to take one of the parts of the system that works pretty well and privatize it. [talking over each other] >> let's make sure nobody gets to do what i did as governor of massachusetts which is privatize medicare. privatize and underfund which is incredible. it is a rejection of both theory and
-- and increased focus on the origin of the food served. the recipe for this buckwheat pancakes is from france. the organic eggs sourced locally. regionalization and globalization at the same time. the finished mulled wine index is steadily climbing. more sophisticated, source will feel right at home here. the one-euro entry price will not be much of a financial setback to anyone dining here. a one-star chef serves gourmet specialties, and the dancers are a far cry from a traditional manger scene. not to mention the products. this necklace costs 480 euros. or how about an ivory tusk from an extinct mammoth? the specialty products for sale make the markets popular with international customers. >> a lot of things are handmade and not chinese. >> we have one in manchester. i wanted to see what the difference was. much better. >> christmas markets are a big draw for tourists and locals alike. this year's offerings are sure to delight a variety of pallets and budgets. and if there was any doubt, winter has most definitely arrived in germany. >> oh, yes, it has appeared the first bill falls in the c
through paris and france and europe and exchange music was traveling aboard as well and i got the experience some of the music he speaks of and it was enjoyable, so i wish him the best of luck on that. as far as the conditions that were listed, there is an extensive list, however nothing out of the ordinary for a venue replacing the blue m cc aw, the only issue that mr. einselen brought up that we spoke about was number 3 on your list, i think that was just semantic, it states patrons must be visually and audio recorded, strike the audio, that was a clerical error, if you will, and again, you also addressed many of the same thoughts we had as far as business plan, what kind of venue he's promoting, what kind of crowd he's bringing in, it's excited to see the outcome, so if you have any questions. >> it's long. but nothing out of the usual, i don't think. >> do you know what kind of clothing you want the security staff to wear? >> the clothing is just something that distinguishes them easily from patrons. >> [inaudible] and striped shirts. and a mustache. >> and a baguette. >>
fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at the morgan called winston churchill, the power of words. >> what you're loo
. he then offered him the position as minister of france. >> michael hill on the minister to france during the 1870 franco-prussian war. they provide political and humanitarian support. sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >> former congressional leaders discuss what washington learned from the 1990 deficit agreement that eventually helped frame the federal budget into surplus. speakers include tom fully. this is just under three hours of. >> ok. welcome. i am the director of public administration program. i want to welcome you to the session, which we are calling looking back to move a forward. this is co-sponsored by george mason university and the bipartisan policy center. it is our pleasure to put this on and to recognize with all the frenzy about the fiscal cliff that we have a history. some of the history is successful in resolving deep seated hard choices. that is will we will look back and talk about today and see whether we can learn any lessons from the experience. we will go over the detailed program in a few minutes. i want to introduce our keynote speaker tom davis. he has c
action. france called for aid, nothing happened. turkey called for safe haven, nothing happened. everybody is looking to the united states. unfortunately, it is the same position since august of last year, which focused more on the target sanctions and all of that. unless there is actually a change in the u.s. position to take more action, i do not think something will change in the military. building a central command of the free syrian army, that needs training, international assistance. that is something only the united states can do. >> do you have a follow up question? >> my question is, you have said the days of asad are numbered and it is only a matter of time before he falls. what can we expect to happen with them when he falls? will we see a scene similar to libya where his body is dragged through the streets? will he be tried in syria? what do you envision to happen, and what do you hope to happen? >> that is difficult to answer. we know the days of the regime is approaching. that may take one year or more. we see that with the reluctance and the hesitance of the inter
supplies. the rebels have also scored on the diplomatic front as britain, france, turkey and the gulf cooperation council recently recognized their umbrella group the national coalition of syrian revolutionary and oppositional forces as the legitimate representative of the syrian people. and now the u.s. may go along as well 37 in washington today secretary of state hillary clinton was guarded as she discussed the rebel's recent successes. >> opposition in syria is now caping of holding ground, and they are better equipped and more able to bring the fight to the government forces. i don't know that you can say that for the entire country it is yet at a tipping point but it certainly seems that the regime will be much harder pressed in the next months. >> eliot: in cairo protesters continue to press the regime of president mohammed morsi to relinquish the new powers he announced for himself this week. some protesters also object to the new draft egyptian constitution, which was finished friday and sent to morsi for review. meanwhile in israel you prime prime minister benjamin netanyahu
and two in august. i mean, you have to have august off, right? france. compare that to the average american worker to works about 230 days a year. writer for the national review and maria, a cnn contributor. i'm sure we can all agree we would love that schedule. especially if your compensation remained what it was. now, eric cantor, being serious here, says the new calendar allows lawmakers a week a month to spend back at home. when ip did the math, 126 days in washington is 25 workweeks. that's only 50% of the year. >> erin, members of congress are still doing their jobs when they are in their constituencies, when they are reaching out to their constituents. they are still working on legislation and much else. if you are concerned about congress wasting time, we ought to be more concerned about the fact that individual candidates are raising money rather than parties. that's the thing that really distracts them from the hard work of legislating. being out there in their districts, that's actually really, really important as a part of their job. >> i think we can all agree with tha
. eight days in january, two in august. you got to have august off, right? france. compare that to the average american worker to works about 230 days a year. rihan and maria, okay, i'm sure we can all agree we would love that schedule. okay, especially if your compensation remained what it was. now, eric cantor, being serious here, says the new calendar allows lawic makers to spend time at home. 126 days in washington is 25 workweeks. that's only 50% of the year. >> members of congress are still doing their jobs when they're in their constituencies. they're still working on legislation and much else. if you're concerned about congress wasting time, i think we ought to be more concerned about the fact that individual candidates are raising money, rather than parties. being out there in their districts, getting in touch with folks who understand their interests, that's really, really important as a part of their job. >> i think we can agree on that, but do they need that much time? how much of this is going to things americans don't want? >> it's way too much, i think, erin,
and france with some rates above 50%. in the united states, the average income tax rate is 29%. federally, 39.6% is the highest rate. someone will pay in the united states. so for today's q&a, are americans getting a bargain or are europeans getting ripped up? let me go first. 60 seconds on the clock starts right now. economies richard cost money to run. there is misplaced popularity in the libertarian myth that governments don't need to involve themselves in most economic matters and that markets will handle whatever needs to be handled. we need taxes. and we need safety and services and infrastructure in return. in some cases, it is simply more economical for governments to provide services because a scale. health care might be one example. the building and maintenance of smart grids and roads. so think of taxes not as needing to be low but of the return from those taxes of needing to be high. now traditionally, richard, that worked in europe. now it doesn't. they got the math badly wrong. so what once provided a high return is now an utter failure which makes america a tax bargain. but tha
the truth about the senate. namely that when jefferson had been our ambassador to france in the constitutional convention, came back, sat with washington for breakfast and asked what was the deal? why did you do the second bicamera body? the senate. did you cool the coffee before drinking it? of course, my throughout is not made of brass. even so, we pour it in a saucer to cool it. the house is made for speed, shorter term, two years, make sure closer connections to the electorat, smaller districts, a little more coraltive, but the senate was made to be a break. it was made as a speed bump, and, often as a dead end. the seeds of the filibuster were planted in the constitution itself. when they are unable to shut off debates, and when the first filibuster did not occur until 1837. cloture was established in 1917, the two-thirds of the vote. during the presence of the filibuster in the period was hugely significant on how the senate went about its business. it was the sword above the chamber in all that it did forcing compromise to move legislation. the filibusters were rar
by mr. michael franc. in this capacity, he helps members of congress and the executive branch understand and defend conservative principles and exercise constitutional power. he previously served as majority leader for dick armey of texas. he was involved in congressional relations and is part of the national potential policy and has worked with representatives in california. we welcome him. thank you, mike. [applause] >> welcome, everyone, welcome to heritage. those who really enjoy detailed discussions, and those who don't. i can see which category we fit into. we have a great panel today. that is something that has become more and more important, as we move forward, especially in the current nature of congress where the party line seemed to be more stark and obvious than they were then some of my early days in washington. we have four experts who will discuss the developments and essentially the filibuster. it has to do with senate procedure and presidents and senate rules and senate precedents on the other. you're going to hear from for individuals with a depth of experience in these
international leader. the u.s., britain, and france told bashar al assad to step down and allow a peaceful transition. he did not act accordingly. he continued to use his security forces and the army to target the civilians and the syrian demonstrators. at exactly the same time, when the international community tried to play a role in the security council, the security council was unable, because of russia and china, which vetoed three times, and double the toe -- double veto, any actions against the assange regime. -- assad regime. should the international community's do actions beyond our outside the security council? it is not allowed for more casualties to be killed. syria, as a nation and the country, is threatened. they side effect of that, as we see right now -- more radicalization, from the country. we see increasing anti-western sentiment in syrian society. that is maybe more to hottest from other countries enough to join the syrian -- more jihadists to join the syrian regime. that is different from maybe the assad regime. he called all the freedom fighters as a terrorist or jihad
in the west bank. the u.s., france and the uk say they will set back decisions. the u.n. gave palestinians nonmember observer state status. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has not publicly acknowledged approval, but a senior government official says he has sign off on those plans. >>> in washington, the calendar is coming ever closer to that fiscal cliff. we'll hear where each side stands and if we are any closer to a deal today. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. when we got marr
of the united states or the rights of men experience of france. the bother us with the rule of law and its -- judicial independence. rule oft bother us with law and a judicial independence. to understand its relevance, and the mainland is destined to follow it, but to learn more and be stimulated by it -- i look forward to the discussion. [applause] >> thank you, ambassador huntsman. thank you, john thornton for your exceptional china program. thank you to colleagues for organizing this wonderful day of activities. whatever this may -- whatever this event may have been called, it is above all a celebration of he weifang. he is brilliant, he is learned, he is courageous. he is a tenacious person with the soul of a saint in fighting justice, fighting for justice. he is a soul of wit who somehow convinces us that fighting for fundamental change in china is a joyful activity. [laughter] the tweet andd by sparks of with the flow from him as readily as sparks flow from an iron factory. as china watchers know, to forge iron, one must be strong. he weifang is strong. the panel has been asked under
then offered him the position as ambassador to france. >> researcher and author michael hill on elihu washburne, the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris providing political and humanitarian support. >> "washington journal" continues. host: ari ne'eman is the president and co-founder of the autistics of advocacy network and is here to talk to us about the federal response to the rise in autism in the united states. our guest is an autistic adults and will be talking about the federal role in supporting an autistic adults and children. he testified before congress earlier this week, and that hearing was covered by c-span if you want to take a look at it. go to our website, c-span.org. thank you for being on the program. >> thank you for having me. >> first, talk to us about what is autism in terms of the spectrum of disorders and some of the symptoms people might want to be on the lookout for. >> i am really glad you asked that. often, people's perceptions of autism come from television or movies like "main man -- "rain man" or 60-second public service announcements
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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